(~simul iustus & peccator~) (lovelies) wrote,
(~simul iustus & peccator~)
lovelies

Ganked from the University gazette:

There's a bit on the tico tico construct, ie. linguistic repetition. The examples it gives in foreign languages are rather bad, because they're pretty much all names: Duran Duran, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Taotao, Miou-Miou. Our suffixes allow for repetitive constructs within a single word. Like - Wool. Ylle in Swedish, Wolle in German. But woolwool, ylleylle, or Wollewolle don't mean anything.

Wool in Finnish is villa. Woolen is villava.

Villavilla has the meaning of 'on/with the woolen'. And there's a list of words like this in Finnish, even though there are a lot more of them:

1. Asiasi (your thing/affair)
2. Minimini (my minimum)
3. Mättämättä (to have kept from beating)
4. Napanapa (as a Pole (instead of something else))
5. Tapatapa (I'm not sure what this means. Something to do with either customs or tapping)
6. Tavattavat (to be met or to be spelled)
7. Tullatulla (with a thing that has gone through customs)
8. Valtavalta (as enourmous)
9. Aasiaasi (to your Asia, or to your ass (the animal))
10. Köhänköhän (something questioning a dry cough)
11. Näkönäkö (as a sight?)
12. Osiosi (your partition)
13. Sakossakos (on the ticket?)
14. Tussatussa (At the inked)

There's a few funny ones that weren't on the list: ammekinammekin ('our bathtub feud also'), pissakopissako ('in/at the piss-booth?'), sinkosinko ('have I tossed?'), ikäänikään ('nor to my age')

And there's a few triple-words, too: enenen ('I multiply'), kokoko ('the size?')

We can even make entire sentences like that: Kokko, kokoa kokoon koko kokko. Koko kokkoko? Koko kokko! Kokko kokosi koko kokon. Koko kokonko? Koko kokon. ('(Man named) Kokko, pile up the entire bonfire. The entire bonfire? The entire bonfire! (The man named) Kokko piled up the entire bonfire. The entire bonfire? The entire bonfire.') While it would make perfect sense to us, anyone else would just hear a long string of coco coco coco coco.

Vihdoin vihdoin vihdoin ('At last I flagellated myself with bouquets of birches')

Keksin keksijä keksi keksin. Keksittyään keksin keksin keksijä keksi keksin keksityksi. ('The inventor of the cookie invented the cookie. After he had invented the cookie he surmised the cookie as invented.')

UCLA's done a bit, too.

Crazy language.
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